Navigation

Infrastructure and Bicycle Riders Crashing – NSW Data

Mining infrastructure Waterous Trail October 2012

The cycling research page here at Aushiker.com has been updated with a new paper in the past week looking at the relationship between infrastructure and crash and injury rates reported by bicycle riders in New South Wales, Australia. The details of the paper follows.

Cycling Research Update: Cycling and Pedestrian Injury Research

Poulos, R.G., Hatfield, J., Rissel, C., Flack, L.K., Murphy, S., Grzebieta, R., & McIntosh, A.S. (2015). An exposure based study of crash and injury rates in a cohort of transport and recreational cyclists in New South Wales. Accident Analysis & Prevention. http://doi:10.1016/j.aap.2015.02.009

This is an interesting article looking at self-reported crash and injury data collected from 2,038 adult bicycle riders in New South Wales. This is a good sample size covering 25,971 days of cycling and 198 crashes (100 being collisions, the greatest involving motor vehicles). This study does not look at the cause of these collisions, rather it focuses more on the nature of the infrastructure.

This focus on infrastructure has led the researchers to conclude “comparison of estimated crash and injury rates on different infrastructure types were limited by the small number of events, however findings suggest that the separation of cyclists from motorised traffic is by itself not sufficient to ensure safe cycling.”

The abstract of the article follows:

This paper examines self-reported prospectively collected data from 2038 adult transport and recreational cyclists from New South Wales (Australia) to determine exposure-based incident crash and injury rates. During 25,971 days of cycling, 198 crashes were reported, comprising approximately equal numbers of falls and collisions. The overall crash rate was 0.290 (95% CI, 0.264–0.319) per 1000 km or 6.06 (95% CI, 5.52–6.65) per 1000 h of travel. The rate of crashes causing any injury (self-treated, or medically attended without overnight hospital stay) was 0.148 (95% CI, 0.133–0.164) per 1000 km or 3.09 (95% CI, 2.79-3.43) per 1000 h of travel. The rate of crashes causing a medically attended injury (without overnight hospital stay) was 0.023 (95% CI, 0.020–0.027) per 1000 km or 0.49 (95% CI, 0.43-0.56) per 1000 h of travel. No injuries requiring an overnight stay in hospital were reported on days meeting the inclusion criteria. After adjustment for exposure in hours, or for the risks associated with different infrastructure utilisation, the rates of crashes and medically attended injuries were found to be greater for females than males, less experienced than more experienced cyclists, and for those who rode mainly for transport rather than mainly for recreation. Comparison of estimated crash and injury rates on different infrastructure types were limited by the small number of events, however findings suggest that the separation of cyclists from motorised traffic is by itself not sufficient to ensure safe cycling.

One Response to Infrastructure and Bicycle Riders Crashing – NSW Data

  1. dellwilson March 25, 2015 at 1:30 AM #

    Regarding “…findings suggest that the separation of cyclists from motorised traffic is by itself not sufficient to ensure safe cycling.”

    This mirrors my own experience. We don’t have much cycling infrastructure here in North Alabama, so I spend most of my time on the roads with cars. But we do have a few bike paths on which I ride and all my close calls have been riding on those paths. ALL. The issue is that the separation is not total. Who could argue that if you were riding on a bicycle superhighway that totally separated you from traffic would not reduce the chance of collision to zero? If you’re not totally separated, then you’re moving in and out of the traffic (at intersections, at the least), which I find worse than just being in the traffic.

Please share your thoughts ...

%d bloggers like this: