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Maylands Bridge Works Will See New Bicycle Paths Built

Opening Bassenden PSP

The opening of the Bassendean section of the Guildford Road PSP*

The Minister of Transport Mr Troy Buswell in a press release dated October 10, 2012 has announced that two railway bridges (Third Avenue railway bridge and the Seventh Avenue railway bridge) in Maylands will be upgraded with the upgrades commencing in 2013. The upgrade will include the development of new pedestrian/cycle paths which hopefully will connect to the Guildford Road Principal Shared Path.

Third Avenue Railway Bridge

Third Avenue Maylands Railway Bridge

Third Avenue Maylands Railway Bridge (Google Maps)

The first bridge to be upgraded is the Third Avenue Bridge, between Railway Parade and Whatley Crescent, Maylands which currently carries about 9,500 vehicles per day. The upgrade will include the construction of a new steel and concrete bridge with wider traffic lanes, pedestrian/cycle path, balustrades and traffic barriers. Upgrades to the adjoining intersections of the bridge, Railway Parade and Whatley Crescent are said to improve overall road safety. Pre-construction works, including design and survey works, have commenced with construction due to start in November 2013.

I hope and assume that the cycle path on the bridge will connect into the principal shared path that “connects” Midland to Perth city.

Seventh Avenue Railway Bridge

Seventh Avenue Railway Bridge, Maylands

Seventh Avenue Railway Bridge, Maylands **

The second bridge to be “upgraded” is the historically recognised Seventh Avenue Bridge in Maylands which it is planned to replace. Whilst I appreciate the need to have good infrastructure it is disappointing that this historical bridge will be replaced rather than upgraded and hence retaining its character. I do hope that the design features will retain its historical character.

The works will involve construction of a new steel and concrete bridge with wider traffic lanes, pedestrian/cycle path, balustrades and traffic barriers. Design features will be agreed with the City of Bayswater to ensure heritage requirements are met.

Minor pre-construction works have been undertaken with works due to start by 2014-15.

Once again one hopes that the cycle path on the bridge will connect into the principal shared path that “connects” Midland to Perth city.

Your Turn To Talk

Please do share your thoughts on these upgrades with the rest of us by leaving a comment below. I am particularly interested in your thoughts about the potential lost of the Seventh Avenue Railway Bridge.

* This image has been sourced from the Bicycle Transport Alliance.

** This image has been sourced from Photographs of Perth

5 Responses to Maylands Bridge Works Will See New Bicycle Paths Built

  1. kerry brown January 23, 2014 at 2:44 PM #

    my thoughts are this…”why oh why cant this historically recognised bridge, this bridge with so much character that is befitting of the rejuvenated and invigoration of the whatley crescent precinct, be altered using traditional building methods. why does it have to be replaced with concrete, the most enviromentally unfriendly medium on the planet… this beauty is 100 years old… i am truly flabbergasted that we still continue our ignorance in not preserving our history. again this bridge adds so much character to the area… i am so sad again”…

    • Aushiker January 23, 2014 at 8:54 PM #

      I am with you Kerry. Hopefully some sense will prevail.

  2. marnie January 28, 2014 at 9:55 PM #

    If you’d like to register your no vote contact Kent Acott, Journalist for the West Australian who is doing an article kentacott@wanews.com.au. Or Lisa Baker via rachel.macy@mp.wa.gov.au.

    • Aushiker January 29, 2014 at 8:59 AM #

      Thanks Marnie for the details on who to contact to share one’s views.

  3. Peter Duncan March 19, 2015 at 6:00 PM #

    Hi,
    The old (and now demolished) Seventh Avenue bridge certainly had significant heritage value. While I accept that it was well past its ‘use by’ date, and that it was poorly designed and flimsily built in the first place, it could have been preserved. It could have been structurally reinforced at a smaller price than that of demolishing and replacing. There was also the option of lowering both Whatley Crescent and Railway Parade as they passed under the bridge, thereby allowing taller vehicles (i.e. trucks) to safely drive underneath the bridge. The question as to whether it was beneficial to encourage more heavy haulage along what are in essence narrow and minor arterial suburban roads was never considered when the decision to demolish the bridge was taken….

    One of my main grievances about the demolishing of this bridge is the desecration of important political graffiti that had been written on the bridge’s main structural support on the Railway Parade side. This graffiti simply stated “Hungary Hurts” and had been on the bridge since the Soviet crushing of the popular Hungarian Revolution on the 4th of November 1956. I was born 4 days before this awful event and I am now 58 years old. That graffiti on the bridge survived as a memorial for some 50 years until the local council anti graffiti gestapo painted over it some 8 to 10 years ago. The term “vandals” springs to mind……Somewhere underneath the council’s green paint the original graffiti still existed, but no longer. It is gone; I hope someone somewhere took photos and kept a record.

    I will miss this old bridge; it could and should have been preserved.

Please share your thoughts ...

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