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Nuyts Wilderness Walk Track – Hiking the wilderness


I joined a group of folks from the Perth Bushwalkers Club in February 2009 for a four day walk and base camp at Thompson Cove, Nuyts Wilderness, Walpole, Western Australia. We walked into Thompson Cove via the Nuyts Wilderness Walk Track, and also explored Aldridge Cove, Hush Hush Beach (via the Bibbulmun Track) and Mt Hopkins.

The Muttly Mob from the Perth Bushwalkers Club at Alderidge Cove

The Muttly Mob from the Perth Bushwalkers Club at Alderidge Cove

Nuyts Wilderness four day base-camp walk diary

Day 1 (Saturday February 7, 2009) – Heading into Thompson Cove

Nuyts Wilderness interpretative sign

Nuyts Wilderness interpretative sign

We drove directly to the Nuyts Wilderness Walk Trail trailhead from Perth which is located on Tinglewood Drive, Walpole (at the foot of Mount Clare). There is a small carpark here at the point where the Bibbulmun Track crosses Deep River and then commences the ascent of Mount Clare.  The drive down took approximately six hours with a brief stop in Manjimup for lunch.

Bibbulmun Track - Nuyts Wilderness Walk Track Deep River  Suspension Bridge

Bibbulmun Track – Nuyts Wilderness Walk Track Deep River Suspension Bridge

The Nuyts Wilderness Walk Track follows the Bibbulmun Track from Tinglewood Drive, over the Deep River Suspension Bridge until the boot cleaning station.

Ralph at the Bibbulmun Track - Nuyts Wilderness Walk Track boot cleaning station

Ralph at the Bibbulmun Track – Nuyts Wilderness Walk Track boot cleaning station

At the boot cleaning station the Bibbulmun Track swings south, whereas the Nuyts Wilderness Walk Trail continues on the old 4WD track in a south easterly direction. The 4WD track is followed until a t-junction is reached, high above Thompson’s Cove.  At this point, one should take the left track to descend to Thompson Cove camping ground located amongst some Peppermint Trees.

Nuyts Wilderness Walk Trail in 4WD mode

Nuyts Wilderness Walk Trail in 4WD mode

Please keep in mind that there are are no facilities at Thompson Cover, nor is there mobile phone coverage. Water is available from a fresh water spring which can be easily accessed via a short walk track.  A bridge over the stream provides a good point to collect water.

Camping at Thompson Cove, Nuyts Wilderness Walk Track

Camping at Thompson Cove, Nuyts Wilderness Walk Track

Extracting water from the spring at Thompson Cove, Nuyts Wilderness

Extracting water from the spring at Thompson Cove, Nuyts Wilderness

The walk distance from Tinglewood Drive is approximately 6.75 km one-way.

Day 2 (Sunday February 8, 2009) – Exploring Hush Hush Beach via the Bibbulmun Track

Walking the Bibbulmun Track towards Hush Hush Beach

Walking the Bibbulmun Track towards Hush Hush Beach

Today we ventured out following the Nuyts Wilderness Walk Track and the Bibbulmun Track to Hush Hush Beach. Along the way we came across a snake skin. A timely reminder to tread carefully.

Snake skin found on the Bibbulmun Track

Snake skin found on the Bibbulmun Track

To get to Hush Hush Beach, we took the return path on the Nuyts Wilderness Walk Track until the  boot cleaning station. At the boot cleaning station we swung south picking up the Bibbulmun Track until aligned approximately with the eastern end of Poison Hill.

Poison Hill is a distinct hill at the western end of Hush Hush Beach

Poison Hill is a distinct hill at the western end of Hush Hush Beach

Poison Hill is a distinct hill at the western end of Hush Hush Beach. At this location a “sand hill” should be distinct to the left of the track, just before the track swings inland again away from the coast. A this point a track comes off the Bibbulmun Track pretty much bee lining towards Hush Hush Beach.

Hush Hush Beach track

Hush Hush Beach track

Follow this track to the edge of the ridge where you should get a visual of 4WD track and car park at the western end of Hush Hush Beach. From here it is a bit of off-track walking down to the carpark and then there is a track down to the beach. Keep in mind that there is no water at this end of Hush Hush Beach.

Hush Hush Beach - Bibbulmun Track

Hush Hush Beach - Bibbulmun Track

Hush Hush Beach - Bibbulmun Track

Hush Hush Beach – Bibbulmun Track

The walk distance is approximately 7.8 km one way.

Day 3 (Sunday February 9, 2009) – Exploring Mount Hopkins

Mount Hopkins calls - Nuyts Wilderness

Mount Hopkins calls – Nuyts Wilderness

On our third day, in the morning we head off out of Thompson Cove to explore Mount Hopkins which peaks at an impressive 205 metres :). That said don’t let the height put you off visiting Mt Hopkins. The views from the summit are really well worth putting in the effort to get there.

Looking out to sea from Mount Hopkins

Looking out to sea from Mount Hopkins

Inland view over the lakes from Mt Hopkins - Nuyts Wilderness

Inland view over the lakes from Mt Hopkins – Nuyts Wilderness

The walk to Mount Hopkins is approximately 3.5 km return with about 150 metres of climbing. We took about two hours to complete the walk itself.  There is a track to Mt Hopkins which is reasonably easy to follow, however, as you get closer to Mt Hopkins it gets overgrown, so long pants and a long sleeved shirt are recommended.

Approaching Mt Hopkins - Still easy going at this point - Nuyts Wilderness

Approaching Mt Hopkins – Still easy going at this point – Nuyts Wilderness

Getting a little overgrown here - Mt Hopkins - Nuyts Wilderness

Getting a little overgrown here – Mt Hopkins – Nuyts Wilderness

Yes there is a bushwalker there somewhere - Mt Hopkins - Nuyts Wilderness

Yes there is a bushwalker there somewhere – Mt Hopkins – Nuyts Wilderness

Old boot cleaning station - Mt Hopkins - Nuyts Wilderness

Must have been on track after all – an old boot cleaning station – Mt Hopkins – Nuyts Wilderness

As we got closer to Mt Hopkins we pretty much lost the trail to the summit as the photos above show but we then all of a sudden popped out on a boot cleaning station. In the past the trail must have been well defined and maintained and steps where being taken to minimise the spread of dieback as evidenced by the boot cleaning station. From the boot cleaning station we soon reached the first of the granite indicating we where getting near the summit of Mt Hopkins. From there the climb was fairly easy.

Breaking through the scrub on to the granite - summit of Mt Hopkins not far now - Nuyts Wilderness

Breaking through the scrub on to the granite – summit of Mt Hopkins not far now – Nuyts Wilderness

Mt Hopkins provides great views out to sea and inland as mentioned but it also provides an opportunity to “bring the boy out in the man” so to speak with some cool granite rock shapes which encourage climbing and exploring.

Granite formations - Mt Hopkins - Nuyts Wilderness

Granite formations – Mt Hopkins – Nuyts Wilderness

Elephant - Mt Hopkins - Nuyts Wilderness

Elephant – Mt Hopkins – Nuyts Wilderness

Symbol formed on the granite - Mt Hopkins - Nuyts Wilderness

Symbol formed on the granite – Mt Hopkins – Nuyts Wilderness

Truc - Mt Hopkins - Nuyts Wilderness

Truc – Mt Hopkins – Nuyts Wilderness

The track to Mt Hopkins departs from the Thompson Cove camping area, dropping directly into the creek before climbing out again and then heading pretty much straight to Mt Hopkins.  There is a track with a bridge over the stream at Thomson Cove. This is not the right track if you heading out to Mt Hopkins. If you are on the right track, once you have climbed out of the creek you should be able to look back down on your campsite at Thomas Cove.

Truc - Mt Hopkins - Nuyts Wilderness

Stealth Camping – Thompson Cove – Nuyts Wilderness

If  you are using a GPS the following co-ordinates may be helpful. The trailhead is located at 50 H 0468371 612 1929, the boot cleaning station at the foot of Mt Hopkins at 50 H 0469393 6122434 (handy landmark) and Mt Hopkins itself at 50 H 0469554 6122570.

Aldridge Cove sign - Nuyts Wilderness

Aldridge Cove sign – Nuyts Wilderness

After we got back to Thompson Cover and a spot of lunch we headed over the headland for a lazy afternoon of swimming and relaxing at Aldridge Cove.  Aldridge Cove is a must visit when in the area in my view.  It is a pleasant walk,about 1/2 hour long, with a bit of a rock scrambling at Aldridge Cove itself. It is well worth packing in some snorkelling gear as there is a great opportunity for snorkelling and swimming at the Cove.

Aldridge Cove, Nuyts Wilderness

Aldridge Cove, Nuyts Wilderness

Aldridge Cove headlands, Nuyts Wilderness

Aldridge Cove headlands, Nuyts Wilderness

A pool at Aldridge Cove, Nuyts Wilderness

A pool at Aldridge Cove, Nuyts Wilderness

Fungi growing in the water at A pool at Aldridge Cove, Nuyts Wilderness

Fungi growing in the water at A pool at Aldridge Cove, Nuyts Wilderness

Life - Aldridge Cove - Nuyts Wilderness

Life – Aldridge Cove – Nuyts Wilderness

Seaweed growing in the water at Aldridge Cove, Nuyts Wilderness

Seaweed growing in the water at Aldridge Cove, Nuyts Wilderness

Truc reflecting at Aldridge Cove, Nuyts Wilderness

Truc reflecting at Aldridge Cove, Nuyts Wilderness

Ralph enjoying Aldridge Cove waters - Nuyts Wilderness

Ralph enjoying Aldridge Cove waters – Nuyts Wilderness

Truc the intrepid diver - Aldridge Cove - Nuyts Wilderness

Truc the intrepid diver – Aldridge Cove – Nuyts Wilderness

Everyone in - Aldridge Cove - Nuyts Wilderness

Everyone in – Aldridge Cove – Nuyts Wilderness

Day 4 (Monday February 10, 2009) – Heading home

Day four saw us walking out to the cars early in the morning before we headed into Walpole for feed and the drive home. All up a great four days in Nuyts Wilderness. Well worth a visit in my view.

Key GPS co-ordinates – Nuyts Wilderness Walk Trail

Nuyts Wilderness Walk Trail trailhead – 50 H 0467497 6126192

Thompson Cove campsite – 50 H 0468357 6121932

Hush Hush Beach car park – 50 H 0463911 6123592.

Mt Hopkins trailhead – 50 H 0468371 612 1929,

Mt Hopkins boot cleaning station – 50 H 0469393 6122434

Mt Hopkins summit – 50 H 0469554 6122570.

Aldridge Cove’s western end – 50 H 0467658 612 1668.

Resources and other websites related to the Nuyts Wilderness Walk Trail

Your Turn To Talk

I hope you liked this post! Please do stop by the comment section below and share your thoughts on the walking in the Nuyts Wilderness area and walking the Nuyts Wilderness Walk Trail with the rest of us. I am always interested in feedback on my walk reports, how I might improve them and what others experiences are trail and/or area so please do share your thoughts by leaving a comment below :) Also if you can share more up to date information on the area that would be really appreciated.

10 Responses to Nuyts Wilderness Walk Track – Hiking the wilderness

  1. Max January 6, 2010 at 9:02 PM #

    Great place – pristine, but changing. Too many fire events in the region are changing the bio-diversity mix. See it in the late spring and you will be blown away by the vast array of flowering plant forms.

  2. Barney February 11, 2010 at 6:07 PM #

    I agree with Max; great place, but…
    I’ve been there about a dozen times over the last 20 years and unfortunately seen the biggest changes in the last couple, but not from fire. People chopping down peppermint trees in the camping area to make crap furniture. removal of the whale bones and litter taking away some of the things that made Nuyts Wilderness so very special. I’m now looking for a new Nuyts.

  3. Jane James November 21, 2012 at 4:48 PM #

    We day- walked (drove from Denmark to the Deep River crossing) 2 weeks ago and today. We found the track to Thompson cove very overgrown and many trees and bushes had fallen on the track. We left a message at DEC Walpole today in the hope they can clear it a bit. The T Cove was beautiful, but Andrew remembers it when you could camp down by the cove, now very overgrown ( about 20 years ago)
    We went to Aldridge Cove today. The wildflowers were still beautiful, but quite a warm day. The swim at the cove was magical, and didn’t think I should see it again so soon on your blog. Really cools one down and the spray on the rocks was great. 5 of us: the Wednesday Walkers from Denmark. Thanks for your Blog. Jane

    • Andrew Priest November 22, 2012 at 7:56 AM #

      Thanks Jane for the update and good to hear you have an enjoyable visit. I think that DEC is letting it vegetation reclaim the track as it is a wilderness area and hence man’s intervention is meant to be minimised. That said I am interested in hearing DEC’s response if any.

    • Tom February 11, 2013 at 8:31 PM #

      Thanks for the blog! I went down there today. The trees on T Cove path have been cleared. Now it’s just a bit overgrown with grass, but easy to follow because of blue markers tied to trees. The camping area is still there and quite clear. Nuyts Trail needs a trim.

      • Andrew Priest February 12, 2013 at 12:54 PM #

        Thanks for sharing your update Tom. I should get back there again this year.

  4. Inspiration Outdoors April 29, 2013 at 8:14 PM #

    Bucket list keeps getting longer! Thanks for sharing this one.

    • Andrew Priest April 30, 2013 at 2:01 PM #

      :) Well worth getting out there in the warmer months for sure.

  5. Tristan Eastwood July 16, 2013 at 4:29 PM #

    i think a bit of over growth is good, makes the trip more rewarding when you arrive at the cove. has anyone ever heard of an area just Sth east of Mt Hopkins nic named valley of arms.. or something similar. i have heard there is an area of tingles growing close together with there bottom limbs stretched out horizontally like arms. i was not able to find it last time..

    • Andrew Priest July 19, 2013 at 6:57 AM #

      I haven’t heard about the tingles. Sounds like an excuse to go back and have a look for them :)

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