Navigation

Risk factors for causing road crashes involving cyclists

Accident Analysis & Prevention

The March 2013 issue of Accident Analysis and Prevention has a couple of articles related to cycling. The second of those articles is this one, titled, Risk factors for causing road crashes involving cyclists: An application of a quasi-induced exposure method, authored by Martinez-Ruiz, Lardelli-Claret, Jimenez-Mejias, Amezuca-Prieto, Jimenenez-Moleon, & de Dios Luna del Castillo (2013).  The paper adopts a quasi-induced exposure approach applied to the Spanish Register of Traffic Crashes to identify driver- and vehicle-related factors associated with the risk of causing a road crash involving a cyclist in Spain from 1993 to 2009. If you are interested, please click through for the abstract and download link.

A quasi-induced exposure approach was applied to the Spanish Register of Traffic Crashes to identify driver- and vehicle-related factors associated with the risk of causing a road crash involving a cyclist in Spain from 1993 to 2009. We analyzed 19,007 collisions between a bicycle and another vehicle in which only one of the drivers committed an infraction, and 13,540 records that included the group of non-infractor cyclists in the above collisions plus cyclists involved in single-bicycle crashes. Adjusted odds ratios were calculated for being responsible for each type of crash for each factor considered. Age from 10 to 19 years, male sex, alcohol or drug consumption and non-helmet use were cyclist-related variables associated with a higher risk of crash, whereas cycling more than 1 h increased only the risk of single crashes. Bicycles with brake defects and ridden by two occupants were also at higher risk of involvement in a crash, whereas light defects were associated only with collisions with another vehicle. For drivers of the other vehicle, age more than 60 years, alcohol, not using safety devices and nonprofessional drivers were at higher risk. The risk of colliding with a bicycle was higher for mopeds than for passenger cars.

An interesting aspect to this paper is the authors attributing the non-wearing of a helmet with the higher risk of a crash.  I am struggling to see how wearing a helmet can contribute to an accident. Worth a read for that alone in my view.

A copy of the paper, Risk factors for causing road crashes involving cyclists: An application of a quasi-induced exposure method, authored by Martinez-Ruiz, Lardelli-Claret, Jimenez-Mejias, Amezuca-Prieto, Jimenenez-Moleon, & de Dios Luna del Castillo (2013) can be downloaded from my Dropbox. A list of cycling related research can be found here.

No comments yet.

Please share your thoughts ...

%d bloggers like this: